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April 09, 2005

Mama Chu Quotes

Ancient Chinese Wisdom has no equal and to prove that Moxie has begun dispensing bite sized tidbits of Mama Chu quotes.

How can you dispute such Wisdom as; "Why you wear fancy clothes? Why? Who you think you are? Grammar girl?"

Or: "It's not that you stoopid. You just need be more smark"

Or this little jewel: "All people in LA screw me off & lie on my face"


It`s hard to beat Wisdom and Eloquence such as that.
It`s possible that even the venerable and eloquent Cassandra whom I admire greatly, might have to defend her "Blog Princess" title against Mama Chu in order to retain her Crown.

Hmmm...A Blog Princess cat fight ? It`s sounds as if it could be very exrotic to watch.

- Joatmoaf -

April 9, 2005 at 11:37 AM | Permalink | Comments (10) | TrackBack

On This Day

April 9, 1865

The Amarican Civil War ends.


At Appomattox, Virginia, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. Forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed constantly by Union cavalry, Lee had no other option.

April 9, 1940

Germany Invades Norway


During World War II, Nazi Germany invades neutral Norway, surprising the Norwegian and British defenders of the country and capturing several strategic points along the Norwegian coast. During the invasion's preliminary phase, Norwegian Fascists under Vidkun Quisling acted as a so-called fifth column for the German invaders, seizing Norway's nerve centers, spreading false rumors, and occupying military bases and other locations. In June, Norway fell to the Nazis.


April 9, 1942

U.S. Surrenders in Bataan


On this day in 1942, Major General Edward P. King Jr. surrenders at Bataan, Philippines--against General Douglas MacArthur's orders--and 78,000 troops (66,000 Filipinos and 12,000 Americans), the largest contingent of U.S. soldiers ever to surrender, are taken captive by the Japanese.


April 9, 1987

George Shultz Condemns Soviet Spying


Just days before he is to travel to Moscow for talks on arms control and other issues, U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz states that he is "damned angry" about possible Soviet spy activity in the American embassy in the Soviet Union. Soviet officials indignantly replied that the espionage charges were "dirty fabrications."

However, charges of Soviet espionage in the U.S. embassy in Moscow threatened to derail any discussions. In particular, U.S. officials charged that since at least the early 1980s, Soviet espionage agents had gained access to the American embassy in Moscow by working through the Marine guards stationed there. In addition, there were allegations that the new U.S. embassy under construction was riddled with Soviet spying equipment. Shultz declared, "They invaded our sovereign territory, and we're damned upset about it."


Hippy History:

April 9, 1969

"Chicago Eight" Plead Not Guilty


The Chicago Eight, indicted on federal charges of conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago, plead not guilty. The trial for the eight antiwar activists had begun in Chicago on March 20. The defendants included David Dellinger of the National Mobilization Committee (NMC); Rennie Davis and Thomas Hayden of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS); Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, founders of the Youth International Party ("Yippies"); Bobby Seale of the Black Panthers; and two lesser known activists, Lee Weiner and John Froines.

They were charged with conspiracy to cross state lines with intent to incite a riot. Attorneys William Kunstler and Leonard Weinglass represented all but Seale. The trial, presided over by Judge Julius Hoffman, turned into a circus as the defendants and their attorneys used the court as a platform to attack Nixon, the war, racism, and oppression. Their tactics were so disruptive that at one point Judge Hoffman ordered Seale gagged and strapped to his chair. (Seale's disruptive behavior eventually caused the judge to try him separately). When the trial ended in February 1970, Hoffman found the defendants and their attorneys guilty of 175 counts of contempt of court and sentenced them to terms ranging from two to four years. Although declaring the defendants not guilty of conspiracy, the jury found all but Froines and Weiner guilty of intent to riot. The others were each sentenced to five years and fined $5,000. However, none of the defendants served time because in 1972 a Court of Appeals overturned the criminal convictions and eventually most of the contempt charges were also dropped.


UPDATE:

April 9, 1945

"This is the end - but for me, the beginning of life"

Those were not the words of Pope John Paul II, but of German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer, executed 60 years ago today by the Nazis in the closing days of World War II.

Read this great article on Dietrich Bonhoeffer over at The Night Writer

Found at Amy Ridenour`s


- Joatmoaf -

April 9, 2005 at 10:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack